** FILE ** Piles of softwood lumber destined for export, are stacked at a Richmond, B.C., Canada lumberyard, March 20, 2002.  Canadian and U.S. officials said Tuesday, July 29, 2003, they have reached a tentative deal to settle a long-running dispute over imports of Canadian softwood lumber used to build homes in the United States. (AP Photo/CP/Richard Lam, File)
RICHARD LAM ** FILE ** Piles of softwood lumber destined for export, are stacked at a Richmond, B.C., Canada lumberyard, March 20, 2002. Canadian and U.S. officials said Tuesday, July 29, 2003, they have reached a tentative deal to settle a long-running dispute over imports of Canadian softwood lumber used to build homes in the United States. (AP Photo/CP/Richard Lam, File)

In an article written for Huffington Post Canada, Jerry Dias explores the ever-looming Canadian/American Softwood Lumber Agreement. With seven months left to negotiate a new deal, Dias argues that presenting the U.S. with a "reasonable deal" will only get more difficult as the U.S. gets closer to its presidential election. In addition, Dias stresses the importance of a united Canadian front:

It is vital that we have a unified Canadian position that protects Canadian jobs. In the last round of negotiations a decade ago, the provinces and companies took separate positions, based on their own needs.

The predictable result was a deal that favored the U.S. That can't happen this time.

To read more of Dias's opinion, follow the link below.

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